Microsoft patents a method to “computerize the human body” and use it as a conduit for power transmission, data surveillance and control

Feb 9, 2024 | Political News

Microsoft’s latest innovation in computer science seeks to “computerize the human body” and use people as conductive mediums to transmit power and data. This system will be able to collect intimate information from the body for surveillance and data analysis and ultimately for remotely controlling people’s behaviors and thoughts. By computerizing the human body and digitizing every impulse, motive and behavioral pattern, humans become hack-able creatures whose perception can be controlled through emotional and sensory stimulants transmitted directly back to them.
 

Microsoft patent portends a future of hack-able humans, wired for control

Patent US6754472B1 lays out Microsoft’s plans for using humans as an apparatus for distributing power to devices coupled to the human body. By using the human body as a power source and connecting people to peripheral devices, Microsoft can turn the human body into a computer network. Corporations can then extract data and stimulate human senses, all while exposing the internal organs and cellular systems to EMFs. As the human body becomes computerized, corporations can then communicate messages and use official narratives to guide people’s behavior. By providing a constant stream of data, humans will be controlled by the very devices that are coupled to their computerized body. As the technology advances, these power and communication signals may be transmitted from one body to another through touch.

This invention will not require the use of wearable devices that have a direct interface. This invention can also include multiple wearable microchips that do not have a direct interface. Instead, these microchips can be used as relays across the body, collecting and transmitting data, power and information to the user. In one example, earrings could be used to measure the person’s pulse rate or they could deliver sound to the ear using a cell phone stored in the person’s pocket.